Timeline

2021
1989
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Following the closure of the Charitable Infirmary, the Trust applied to secure the substantial assets of the former hospital site. On the 3rd March 1989, the High Court declared that the Governors and Guardians of the CICT should administer the sale and proceeds of the Jervis Street property under the Cy-Pres Scheme.

1983
R.C.S.I Disease Research Center Beaumont

In 1983 the new hospital at Beaumont was completed and this was opened in 1987 incorporating the Charitable Infirmary and St. Laurences’s (The Richmond) Hospital.

1852
Mother Catherine McAuley, foundress of the Religious Sisters of Mercy

In 1852 the committee of management made the remarkable decision to invite the Sisters of Mercy to supervise nursing in the hospital. This decision was motivated by a desire to improve the standard of nursing in the hospital, and whereas it was recognised that the Sisters were not trained nurses, it was appreciated that they had ‘acquired an experience which renders them very efficient’

1798

The trustees purchased land in St. Mary’s Parish for the erection of a 32-bedded hospital. Subscriptions did not allow fulfilment of this ambitious plan and the hospital now named The Charitable infirmary moved to larger premises on Inns Quay in 1798, where it was possible to accommodate 50 patients.

1792
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The charter was duly granted under the style and title of ‘The Governors and Guardians of the Charitable Infirmary, Dublin’, on June 7th, 1792 by George 111. This prudent move by the governors left the hospital secure at the turn of the century. It could look back with pride to its development from humble origins almost one hundred years earlier and look forward with confidence to the future.

1786

When the plans for the new Four Courts were announced in 1786, it became necessary for the Charitable Infirmary to move on once more. The Earl of Charlemont, having just completed a mansion (now the Municipal Gallery) on Rutland (now Parnell) Square, vacated his old family mansion at No. 14 Jervis Street, which was purchased by the trustees of the hospital.

1742

Seven hundred people attended the Musick Hall in Fishamble Street and so that the hall might accommodate as many as possible the ladies were requested to come without hoops and the gentlemen without their swords. £400 was collected for equal division among the Society for Relieving Prisoners, The Charitable Infirmary and Mercer’s Hospital.

1724

It provided only eight or nine beds, but these were soon filled with ‘the greatest objects until cured.’ Two or more of the founding surgeons gave their attendance ‘constantly for two hours at the said house every morning.’

1703

In 1703 Six Dublin Surgeons, Francis and George Duany, Patrick Kelly, Nathaniel Handson, John Dowdall, and Peter Brenann, opened the first voluntary hospital in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in Cook Street, Dublin.